Archive for the 'Musings' Category

RPG-a-Day 2017

August 2nd, 2017 — Wordman

For each of the past few years, David F. Chapman has published a list of 31 role-playing game related questions in August, coordinated under the moniker “RPG a Day”. This year is no exception. I have not participated in this before because, while I like the idea, I dislike the way my social media feed explodes with answers to each day’s question, tending to drown out other stuff. So, rather than make a separate post for each question, I’m just going to answer them all on a single page, and only post the link to social media at the beginning and the end. This year’s questions are:

RPGaDay 2017 questions

1st) What published RPG do you wish you were playing right now?

There are a ton of games on this list, but I really want to be playing something with my six year old son right now, something like No Thank You, Evil! by Monte Cook Games, built on a kid-friendly iteration of the Cypher System. I backed both of the Kickstarter’s for this game, so have a full complement of gear for it. The game scales to age by simplifying the “I’m a {adjective} {noun} who {verbs}” pattern for a character’s concept based on age (e.g. the youngest kids have characters defined just by “I’m a {noun}”. I’ll be interested to see how much complexity my son can handle. I’m guessing this could lead into playing the Cypher System game Predation, which he would really dig.

2nd) What is an RPG you would like to see published?

The teased and hinted at Danger Patrol Gamma. While the current “Pocket Edition” of Danger Patrol by John Harper’s one.seven design studio has been the last word in the game, this edition gave up some of the things I liked about the beta version. The author has hinted at a “gamma” version, which looked like it was going to be card based. Using cards (or the half-pages of the beta version), you guarantee that no two people are making use of the same option in their character, which can’t be said of the pocket edition. Yet, the pocket edition has some clear improvements over the beta version, so I’m looking forward to something that does both.

3rd) How do you find out about new RPGs?

Mostly by reading my G+ feed. If you’ve been thinking G+ is a ghost town, you’re wrong, particularly when it comes to RPGs.

Some other sources are worth mentioning, though. One of the best things to happen to RPGs in the last year or two has been the culture of play fostered by the Gauntlet and its associated podcasts, particularly its main community podcast. It’s common for a given episode to call my attention to a game I’d never heard of, or known only marginally.

I also kickstart a lot of games. Unfortunately, Kickstarter’s search is still terrible and its support for RSS is non-existent. Recently, Leo Zovic built a bunch of Atom feeds for Kickstarter. These can be customized, so I built one that provides a custom RSS feed for RPG projects on Kickstarter. One drawback is that it also shows computer games marked as “rpgs”, but that’s as good as Kickstarter’s search can manage.

4th) Which RPG have you played the most since August 2016?

This is, sadly, an easy question to answer, because I haven’t played much in the past year. What I have played has been mostly Dungeon World, by Sage LaTorra and Adam Koebel.

Specifically, we’ve been playing in Monte Cook’s Ptolus setting, using a few custom rules to tune the system to the setting, which is a bit more cosmopolitan and magic item heavy than straight Dungeon World.

5th) Which RPG cover best captures the spirit of the game?

Shadowrun cover

6th) You can game every day for a week. Describe what you’d do!

clay-that-wokeI’m assuming this means all day, every day, so I’d go somewhere with great scenery and minimal hustle and bustle, like Zion National Park or a yacht anchored off Kleftiko or something. The games would depend on the players, but I’ll guess a bit. This would probably be a trip without the kids. We’d divide each day into three four hour sessions, with meals in between.

Each morning session would be a different game, run as a one-shot. In these games, we’d try to enforce the tone, whatever that might be. We’d probably run, in no particular order:

Each afternoon session would be one installment of a seven session mini-campaign of something. It would probably one of these:

Evening sessions would be games that play well while drinking, and would likely not be serious at all. Most would be one-shots, but maybe a few could go a couple sessions.

7th) What was your most impactful RPG session?

exalted1It wasn’t a bad session. In fact, I barely remember most of it, which was a lot of the problem. I do remember that we didn’t get as far along as I’d hoped, and thinking about why, a blunt question popped into my head: “why are you investing so much time and effort into a game with such shit mechanics? Again?” I still don’t have a justifiable answer to this question, but after that session I gave up on deep diving into irredeemable rulesets just because I loved the setting to which they were attached.

I’d done this before. For years prior, I’d spent a ton of free time building crap for another game with mechanics almost as bad, maintaining a big gear list, even managing the FAQ. It, too, had a world that I loved then and still love now. I gave up on that game, but for kinda the wrong reason. That was more of a feeling that I just wasn’t getting enough back from the game as I was putting into it. (It didn’t help that I burned a bridge with the game’s creators entirely by accident.)

Don’t get me wrong, I still love the worlds of Exalted and Shadowrun, and I will play again in those worlds in a heartbeat, but only using totally different rules. After that session, I’m never going to devote myself to shit systems ever again.

8th) What is a good RPG to play for sessions of 2hrs or less?

diesel-micePretty much any game for kids better fit into sessions two hours or less. From what I’ve heard of people running games with really little kids, their attention spans don’t stick with the game for more than a half-hour or so. Turns out you are spoiled for choice in the “games targeted at kids” arena, these days, with games like:

9th) What is a good RPG to play for about 10 sessions?

I tend not to play campaigns in this duration much, usually either shorter or much longer. Any game that can handle more than ten sessions can certainly handle just ten, but there are some games which contain a bit more meat than you can reach in a one shot where you might not want to devote a year of play to it. That seems like it depends more on your curiosity level than it does on the game.

I’d be interested in playing ten sessions of Legacy: Life Among the Ruins, to give its multi-generational and family mechanics a good stretch. Maybe I will do that when the second edition (currently being kickstarted) is ready.

10th) Where do you go for RPG reviews?

I almost never seek out RPG reviews. I almost never read “customer reviews” of RPG products at places like One Book Shelf. I no longer frequent role-playing forums.

The only place I even encounter reviews of games are the stray mentions on social media and the play reports on the Gauntlet podcast. I’ve also enjoyed when Rob Donoghue deep dives into one system or another over multiple blog long blog posts (here’s the first one for 13th Age, for example).

11th) Which ‘dead game’ would you like to see reborn?

primalThe Primal Order isn’t really dead. No game really is, particularly with all the resurrections being done on Kickstarter lately. TPO was more dead than most for years, until 2013, when Peter Adkison republished the PDF of the game. Given the lack of support since, though, it seems likely that this republishing was more of a way to retain certain legal rights to the property than any firm desire to resurrect the game.

Also, TPO wasn’t exactly a game, but rather a “capsystem” that allowed you to add gods to any game in a way that made them more than just “NPCs with really good stats”. It also opened an interesting way for playing gods as PCs, in its own early-1990’s fashion. It’s not quite right, but there is a lot of meat there that more modern game design could extract.

The game has been a bit of a legal mess, largely because it implemented its notion of being a “capsystem” (a rules set that sits on top of other rules systems) backwards. At the end of TPO were a set of appendices, each one of which detailed how to use TPO with an existing system (e.g. AD&D, Ars Magica, Shadowrun, etc.). Game rules can’t be copyrighted and the book properly sighted copyrights and trademarks, so legally wansn’t infringing. People brought lawsuits against it anyway. That was part of what killed the game. The other was that its small-time publisher soon had its hands full turning another game it produced a year later, Magic: The Gathering, into a globe-spanning juggernaut.

At any rate, now days, making a “capsystem” would more likely succeed the other way around: being issued as an open license. Publishers (or fans) could then build the conversions themselves, if they needed to. (In the present environment, I’m not sure anyone would really find converting something into whatever system they used that unusual or burdensome enough to need a special document for it anyway.)

I have toyed with the idea of buying the IP for TPO for the sole purpose of releasing it under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. In fact, I’ve wondered allowed about setting up something like a charity that exists to secure permission to do this with other dormant games. This is probably a pipe dream though, as most publishers appear to be content sitting on games that earn nothing and would cost too much to put back into print, assuming some alchemy will suddenly make them worthwhile again (I guess) rather than find out what cool stuff an unfettered world with do with it.

12th) Which RPG has the most inspiring interior art?

Numenera wins awards for interior art for a reason. The whole product line just looks phenomenal and makes me want to explore the place. It also has the advantage of being slightly strange without being grimdark body-horror stuff.

13th) Describe a game experience that changed how you play.

After playing a lot from grade school through a number of years after college, I entered a long stretch where I was moving around and couldn’t really get into a gaming groove. Eventually, I got back on the horse but, in the interim, things like the Forge happened and I missed most of it. So, when I happened across a copy of Wushu, a wuxia action game, I was, appropriately, punched in the face by its introduction:

Action movies have always been at odds with realism. Fortunately for us, their conflict is easily resolved with a series of savage kicks to realism’s face! Impossible leaps, insane acrobatics, and victory against overwhelming odds are all staples of the genre… and the essential elements of action role-playing games.

Sadly, traditional RPGs have long been in league with realism. They penalize players who want to, say, kick seven mooks with one spin kick by piling negative modifiers onto their roll, which makes them less likely to succeed. The inevitable result is that smart players stick to simple, boring actions and take a tactical approach to combat. Wushu breaks up this insidious alliance with a core mechanic that rewards players for vivid descriptions and over-the-top stunts by making them more likely to succeed, each and every time.

For anyone who’d been paying attention to what was happening in gaming up to then, this sentiment would be totally unsurprising and obvious but, for me, it was a satori moment, combining both a sense that I’d been doing it wrong for decades with a clear illumination about how to proceed. (Then, I wandered from the path immediately by starting to play Exalted.)

14th) Which RPG do you prefer for open-ended campaign play?

monsters-magic13th-ageI’m answering this one with what game I would pick if I wanted to start a new open-ended campaign. Such campaigns tend to feature long player power curves, where characters “improve” over a long time scale, and more traditional games tend to focus on this more. Apart from some of the other games I’ve mentioned in previous questions, it’d be a toss up between two different takes on fantasy.

One choice would be 13th Age. When Wizards of the Coast went off to ruminate on building the fifth edition of Dungeons & Dragons, the lead designers of third and fourth editions teamed up to create an alternative, released about a year before “D&D Next” was. The result impresses me as more than just an extension/evolution of 3E and 4E, but a more cohesive game entirely. Running an open ended campaign in this system, I would definitely throw their unique take on the megadungeon, Eyes of the Stone Thief, into the mix.

Another choice would be Monsters & Magic by Sarah Newton. Unlike some OSR stuff which merely apes early D&D editions (all of which also still exist), M&M is framed to allow use of all those old school adventures you have (particularly the old Judges Guild stuff) right out of the box, but still embraces the idea that game design has usefully advanced in 40 years. (If, for some reason, you want to know if this makes it a “legitimately OSR game”, there are no shortage of self-appointed OSR gatekeepers eager for followers they can shepherd to the answer; my interest in that question is zero.)

There are so many other games, I’m not sure I’ll ever get either of these to the table, but each sounds fun for its own reasons.

15th) Which RPG do you enjoy adapting the most?

anima-primeI’ve had a ton of fun hacking on Anima Prime, a game by Christian Griffen that bills itself as a “fast-paced, spontaneous roleplaying game inspired by the Final Fantasy series of video games as well as Avatar: The Last Airbender and other animated shows and movies”. (Note: because of the name, this game is sometimes confused with the heartbreaker Anima: Beyond Fantasy. There is no relation.)

My immediate thought when first reading Anima Prime was “oooo…I could hack this to play Exalted” and I’ve spent quite a bit of effort doing just that. I posted my first tinkerings on the unofficial Exalted wiki in 2011. Since then I’ve gone a bit overboard with it. I built a big document just for my group called Exaltation Prime, which turned into a full layout project, using inspiring “borrowed” art and lots of changes and iterations (on version 1.5 at the moment). I wound up with something of manageable size that would allow you to play any type of the exalted (each of which required 250 page “splatbooks” in their original system) plus a number of character types that you can’t really play in the original game. (Want to play as a manse? No problem.) Exalted is a “kitchen sink” game, and my hack can also manage most of its more involved systems (e.g. sorcery, shapeshifting, shaping, crafting, astrology, warstriders, etc.).

One of the things I love about Anima Prime is that it is a little bit crunchy, but not massively so. This hits a sweet spot for me. Another thing I like is that with just some simple ideas, there is quite a bit to hang hacks onto. In the time that I’ve been hacking on it, its author has done some hacking of his own, usually aimed at making the game more simple or GM-less or the like. My hacks tend to go the other way, making it a slightly more complicated.

Unfortunately, I can’t really release what I’ve done in its current form, mostly due to the borrowed art, but also because Exalted is a closed system. Fortunately, Anima Prime itself is released under a Creative Commons license. I’ve been toying with the idea of sanitizing the hacks I’ve made to it of references to Exalted and releasing more of a “hacking guide” to the game, called Prime Spiral. I should really get cracking on that.

16th) Which RPG do you enjoy using as is?

Every game. At least the first time I play it. There is a tendency to want to drift games as you read them, thinking “that probably won’t work unless I tweak it like this”. Resist! The designer probably thought about whatever it is longer, harder and deeper than you have. You owe it to both yourself and the designer to try the game as written at least once. It may turn out that you were right, but sometimes you discover surprises during play.

17th) Which RPG have you owned the longest but not played?

vampire-masqueradeThe phrasing of this question results in, to me, a surprising answer: the original Vampire: The Masquerade. While I certainly bought some games before this that I never played, I do not still own them, and haven’t for a while. V:tM is still on my bookshelf, though.

I almost played once, even going so far as to conceive a character, but that game never actually hit the table. After that, whatever motivation I might have had to play was stymied by lack of interested compatriots. I didn’t really look very hard, I suppose.

This game features an example of something that happens to me when I read games from time to time. Occasionally, while reading, I’ll get fixated on a sentence in the text and that leads somewhere for play. I remember reading a sentence in the V:tM that mentioned vampires of a particular clan tend to get “stuck” in the fashions of the time they first became vampires and thinking “man, what if you got turned when fashion sucked?” This, naturally, led to the character I conceived: a young Ventrue stuck in the pastels and stubble of Miami Vice-era fashion.

I still want to play that guy.

18th) Which RPG have you played the most in your life?

universal-brotherhood-flyerThis question was asked on G+ a while back and figuring out my answer surprised me. By hours played:

  1. Shadowrun (second edition)
  2. Exalted (first edition)
  3. Star Frontiers
  4. Top Secret
  5. D&D (second edition)

AD&D misses the list, but only barely. If you combine D&D editions/Pathfinder, it might push into third position, maybe second.

19th) Which RPG features the best writing?

gamma-world-6-gmgEveryone is going to answer this question with Paul Czege’s The Clay That Woke, which is the right answer, but I already mentioned that game above, so I’m going to take a different angle.

A whole bunch of roleplaying games have a “what is a roleplaying” section. Many also have a “what is being a game master all about” section. The vast majority of these are terrible. One, however, was not. The sixth edition Gamma World Game Master’s Guide opens with a chapter called “Some Assembly Required” that might be the best “what is being a game master all about” advice of all time. The book is otherwise fairly unremarkable, but that opening is gold.

That chapter was written by Greg Stolze in 2004, about three years before he wrote Reign (a game that, among other things, lacks both a “what is roleplaying” and a “how to GM” section). Since then, he has made two short PDFs with introductory advice available for free on his download page, called “How to Play Roleplaying Games” and “How to Run Roleplaying Games”. At this point, no game needs to ever add sections addressing these two topics, because these two PDFs already exist.

20th) What is the best source for out-of-print RPGs?

joruneI don’t really want to answer this one, because it means competition for when I want to find something out of print. But, the answer is pretty obvious to anyone who has gone looking for out-of-print RPGs: Wayne’s Books.

The store’s interface leaves a little to be desired, but functions well enough. Most of the listings are also posted on Amazon as well, so searching there may lead you to his listings as well.

When a history of roleplaying games was published (the four-volume Designers & Dragons), it really put a dent in my wallet as I was reminded of games I’d had and lost, games I’d always wanted but had forgotten, and games I never knew existed. I found a great deal of what I was after at Wayne’s Books and the experience was flawless each time, particularly in the accuracy of how the book’s condition was described.

21st) Which RPG does the most with the least words?

mechanical-oryxI’ve seen a lot of RPG contests come and go but, honestly, very few entries of any of them really grab me. But I wanted to play Mechanical Oryx instantly. As the winner of this year’s 200 Word RPG Challenge, author Grant Howitt managed to turn just 200 words into something profound. The game might be thought of as playing as the robots in the world of Horizon Zero Dawn, if the robots’ were intended to be benevolent caretakers of the humans.

Seriously, just go read the thing and marvel at the emergent complexity of how the goals of the players will mix with the mechanics they have available to reach them. All in a couple of sentences.

After the winner of the contest was announced, one of the judges interviewed the author, which is worth a listen not only for talking about this particular game, but also about The Spire, which just completed a successful Kickstarter.

22nd) Which RPGs are the easiest for you to run?

23rd) Which RPG has the most jaw-dropping layout?

24th) Share a PWYW publisher who should be charging more.

25th) What is the best way to thank your GM?

26th) Which RPG provides the most useful resources?

27th) What are your essential tools for good gaming?

28th) What film or series is the most-frequent source of quotes in your group?

29th) What has been the best-run RPG Kickstarter you have backed?

30th) What is an RPG genre-mashup you would most like to see?

31st) What do you anticipate most for gaming in 2018?

The curse of a blessing

August 1st, 2011 — Wordman

According to Genesis 1:28, after God created humans, he did some version of the following:

  • And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth. (King James)
  • Then God blessed them and said, “Be fruitful and multiply. Fill the earth and govern it. Reign over the fish in the sea, the birds in the sky, and all the animals that scurry along the ground.” (New Living Translation)
  • God blessed them and said to them, “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish of the sea and the birds of the air and over every living creature that moves on the ground.” (New International Version)
  • benedixitque illis Deus et ait crescite et multiplicamini et replete terram et subicite eam et dominamini piscibus maris et volatilibus caeli et universis animantibus quae moventur super terram (Latin Vulgate)
  • כח  וַיְבָרֶךְ אֹתָם, אֱלֹהִים, וַיֹּאמֶר לָהֶם אֱלֹהִים פְּרוּ וּרְבוּ וּמִלְאוּ אֶת-הָאָרֶץ, וְכִבְשֻׁהָ; וּרְדוּ בִּדְגַת הַיָּם, וּבְעוֹף הַשָּׁמַיִם, וּבְכָל-חַיָּה, הָרֹמֶשֶׂת עַל-הָאָרֶץ. (JPS 1917 Edition)

Ignore, for the moment, that God is bestowing a blessing here, not issuing a command (that is, God is imbuing man with fertility). Also, ignore the multitude of translation problems something like this has.

Instead, assume for a second that this verse means what many in the modern world think it does: God commanding to humans to breed. You can even bring all the baggage you want with that, like the implication that, therefore, birth control is a sin, and so on. Pretend that the first instruction God issued man was to conquer the earth by having lots of babies. Hey, guess what?

Mission Accomplished

We did it! Humans have “filled the earth”!

Can we slow down now?

I don’t know much Hebrew or Latin, so I can’t be sure of the translation, but I’m pretty sure it doesn’t say “be fruitful and multiply, then keep multiplying to the point that you start killing yourself with your own waste”. It seems like self-extermination through overpopulation would seriously hamper the mission to “reign over the fish in the sea, the birds in the sky, and all the animals that scurry along the ground.”

Even if you think we are not choking on our own waste already, how long do you think it will be until we do? How will you know? Think about it this way:

Say you have a jar. In this jar, you will be breeding some sort of organism (yeast or bacteria or something). Let’s say these organisms breed really quickly, with the population doubling every minute. You start breeding at 11am. By noon, the jar is full. Given that the population doubles each minute, what time is it when the jar is half-full?

People who don’t understand the problem (or exponential growth) will naïvely say 11:30. This is wrong, of course. What is not as obvious is that the mathematically correct answer (11:59, one minute before noon) is also wrong. It’s wrong because the population would never actually fill the jar at all. In the real world, the waste products produced by the existing organisms would kill the whole population long before the jar got anywhere near to full.

Now, imagine you are one of the organisms in this jar. What time would it be when you started saying to yourself “man, it is getting really crowded and smelly in here?” And once you notice, is there anything you can do about it? Or is it already too late?

One last thought: suppose waste doesn’t interfere and the jar really does fill up. Then, right at noon, the population finds three more jars, identical to the one they are already in. Hurray! The population is saved! They can expand into the new jars! Well, at least for two more minutes, until 12:02, when these jars fill up as well.

A pitch for HGTV

October 14th, 2010 — Wordman

Dear Home & Garden Television

It is with some concern that I note that no HGTV program appears anywhere near the “top ratings” lists in the late night time slot. In fact, late night HGTV programming consists of little more than repeats of episodes aired previously in the day. While traveling recently, I hit upon an idea for a show your network could create that could provide some ground-breaking late night content (and, likely, more than a little buzz for HGTV).

The background of this idea comes from an experience in a hotel, but it can be universalized to homes, apartments and so on. When people walk into a room that they and their significant other will sleep in, such as a hotel room, they spend some time looking around, noticing the furniture, closets and so on. Somewhere in the back of their heads, one of the things they are evaluating is if and how they will have sex in that room (though some will probably not admit this). Is that table strong enough to sit on? Is that ottoman the right height? Once you start noticing this, you will quickly realize that private spaces, including people’s own bedrooms, are often set up totally wrong for this kind of activity. Here is an example:

In a large hotel in Las Vegas, a room contains a bathtub constructed for two. It looks like this:

Tub

Now you might think that, being a bathtub built to be used by two naked people, there would be some possibility of those two people, naturally, having sex in that bathtub. You could argue, in fact, that this is the whole point of such a tub. But take a good look at the photo. Do you see the problem? Why is the faucet exactly in the spot where one of the occupant’s head would be? Any fantasy you might have about fun in a tub for two is totally ruined by the harsh reality of smashing your head into a piece of metal that should have been placed a meter to the side. And why is that? Why was the faucet placed so stupidly? I submit it is because there is no source that trains designers to think about this kind of thing. It is a real concern people have, but it is never talked about openly, and therefore, not noticed as a need worth serving.

A late night show on HGTV could change that. As a working title, I suggest something like How Are We Supposed to F*$k on That?, though you might want to go with something less provocative. The format would be much like other design shows on HGTV, except that content would be exclusively devoted to design for “personal spaces and needs”. To gain an odd sort of credibility, hosts for the show (one man, one woman) might be drawn from the adult film industry. You are virtually guaranteed to find adult stars with design experience. (A quick Google for “porn star interior designer”, for example, finds this article from ABC news.)

At a guess, the show would likely target a younger audience than some other HGTV programming. I think you would find fairly long list of sponsors as well, looking to get their products noticed in a legitimate venue. An obvious choice, for example, would be Liberator, Inc, who produces furniture intended entirely for sex, but I’m guessing a lot of less overtly sexual products would be interested in buying time or product placement on your show.

As an example, search the Linen & Things web site for “waterproof mattress pads”. You can walk into any L&T and find these in stock, in all sizes. Why? Well, some of it might be for people with bladder problems, such as kids wetting the bed, but in a king-sized bed? I’d wager that the population of people who both have bladder control issues and sleep in a king-sized is vanishingly small, certainly not enough to warrant stocking stocking products for it in every L&T in the country. No, the reason they are there is because lots of people buy waterproof mattress pads to protect mattresses from sex (and not, as you might guess from the pictures, from mysterious blue water). These products are not marketed as such, of course, but that is the reality, one that this show could bring to the public’s attention through product placement.

Naturally, I’m sure you all can think of a number of other ways to push the basic idea of the show, which is why I’m giving the idea to you. Think about it.

(By the way, if anyone feels like designing the title graphic for this show, please put a link to the result in the comments.)

In an alternate reality

October 11th, 2010 — Wordman

In our own world, Spain sent Hernán Cortés and others to conquer the New World. Soldiers slaughtered civilians. Priests single-handedly destroyed nearly all of the written word of a culture in some ways more advanced than Spain’s, largely erasing it from history. And smallpox and other European diseases killed tens of millions of Native Americans.

In an alternate reality, a more enlightened Spain instead enters the New World as partners, negotiating a mutually beneficial co-existence with the Aztec, Inca and other native civilizations. Trust and respect rule the day, making both New World and Old World stronger for the sharing. Each culture shares knowledge the other lacks, to the benefit of all. Everyone holds hands and sings songs, and there is much rejoicing. Then, smallpox and other European diseases kill tens of millions of Native Americans.

Olympic lessons: Vancouver

March 1st, 2010 — Wordman

Just as with the last summer Olympics, I learned some things from Vancouver:

There are not enough sports featuring women and guns.

Curling rules.

So does Canada.

Authority, even when it may have your best interests at heart, should not be followed blindly.

Sometimes, faith in the nation comes from unlikely places.

It is possible, apparently, to stop being a douchebag.

There is a fine line between inspiring feats of skilled daring and just gay.

Colorado is where you want to do dangerous experiments.

Not even really great hockey can keep me awake.

Humor is a dish best served cold.

Athletes are much more interesting when they are athletes, not brands.

Fifty-fifty at ninety is more interesting than margins of 0.1 seconds.

Too few athletes sport that mustache feeling. Even fewer go for the fake mustache. And that is a shame.

Following your dreams is, sometimes, not worth the cost.

It doesn’t need to be pretty to be victory.

Avoiding crashes (mostly) is an Olympic event.

No one took my suggestion, but that doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea.

I have more respect for athletes who risk losing easy medals to try something extraordinary.

Photos from NBC and the official Vancouver site, who gathered them from various sources (mostly Getty, AP and Reuters).

Another perfect name

November 30th, 2009 — Wordman

For the first time in over five years, I have a new entry for my list of perfect names. As you may recall, prior to today, the list held only three items:

To this, a fourth must now be added:

  • A role-playing game about heavy metal bands called Umläut

Health volley

August 20th, 2009 — Wordman

I’m putting together a much longer post to present a tortuous metaphor for the state of American health care, but I keep seeing the same theme in the current “debate” on health that is driving me nuts enough to say something about it here.

Here is an example, this one from Mark Steyn:

I think Sarah Palin’s “death panel” coinage clarified the stakes and resonated in a way that “rationing” and other lingo never quite did.…What matters is the concept of a government “panel.” Right now, if I want a hip replacement, it’s between me and my doctor; the government does not have a seat at the table.

Whatever you may think about Palin or the death panel or whatever, the statement above contains a huge glaring problem. Under the system we have now, while it may be true that the government does not have a seat at the table, if you want a hip replacement, it is most certainly not between you and your doctor. It may be between you and your insurance company, and it may be between that insurance company and your doctor, but if you and your doctor, by yourselves, want to decide on your hip replacement, you are totally fucked under the current state of health care in America.

If you don’t like the current health bills being debated right now, fine, but don’t compare them to an idealized system as if it actually exists when it really doesn’t.

Robert Tracinski makes the same mistake in this piece, when he says (with his own emphasis):

Do the Democrats even understand what insurance is? … Insurance is a form of financing. It is a contract under which a health-insurance company agrees to pay for medical bills that could run into the tens of thousands of dollars, if you are hit by a bus or are diagnosed with cancer, so that you don’t have to pay for those bills out of your savings. For younger people, this means being able to pay for catastrophic care even if you haven’t had time to build up tens of thousands of dollars in savings. For older people, this means not having your retirement savings or the equity in your home get wiped out by an unexpected illness.

It is? Really? Great!

The problem is that while this is what insurance should be, present-day American health insurance doesn’t actually work like this. At all.

You try telling a mother of two “sorry, your kids’ check ups are not covered by your insurance. Insurance is only for unexpected emergencies.” I dare you.

And, likewise, when an actual emergency causes “medical bills that could run into the tens of thousands of dollars”, see how likely the “insurance” is to pay it all.

There is a reason HR departments call it “health coverage” and not “health insurance”: because it is no longer insurance. The “coverage” is now used for pretty much any type of health related expense. The expectation involved is similar to imagining a world where everyone just assumed that their auto insurance would pay for their fuel, oil changes and routine maintenance, instead of just a serious car accident.

While the current state of health care in America isn’t exactly socialized medicine, it is functionally pretty close. Does it really matter that, instead of the bureaucracy of the state that meddles in your health decisions, it is the bureaucracy of a set of corporations that meddles in your health decisions? You (and your doctor) have roughly the same level of control over both of them: almost none.